Open Access

Open access status is provided across the Web of Science platform in partnership with Our Research, a not-for-profit organization that recently launched a knowledge base of Open Access (OA) content. This knowledge base makes it possible to discover and link to legal Gold or Bronze (free content at a publisher's website) and Green (author self-archived in a repository) OA versions. This partnership improves discoverability and access to article-level OA versions by adding more links to OA content and prioritizing the links to the best version of OA content when multiple versions of an article are available. You can learn more about OA on Web of Science at info.clarivate.com/openaccess.

For all open access types, consult the copyright owner for any reuse or licensing requests.

Open Access Type Descriptions
Gold DOAJ Articles published in journals listed on the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). All articles in these journals must have a license in accordance with the Budapest Open Access Initiative to be listed on the DOAJ. Consult DOAJ for their specific definitions.
Other
  • Other Gold open access articles are identified as having a Creative Commons (CC) license by Our Research but are not in journals listed on the DOAJ.
  • Most of these articles are from hybrid journals.
  • Other Gold as an indicator of hybrid gold open access articles is at varying levels of completeness, especially for newly published articles.
Bronze

The licensing for these articles is either unclear or identified by Our Research as non-CC license articles. These are free-to-read or public access articles located on a publisher’s site. 

A publisher may, as a promotion, grant free access to an article for a limited time. At the end of the promotional period, access to the article may require a fee which can lead to temporary errors in our data. You may find content that is incomplete, especially new content.

Green Published Final published versions of articles hosted on an institutional or subject-based repository (e.g., an article out of its embargo period posted to PubMed Central).
Accepted
  • Accepted manuscripts hosted on a repository.
  • Content is peer reviewed and final, but may not have been through the publisher’s copy-editing or typesetting.